What You Need to Know Before Buying Art for Your Home

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WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE BUYING ART FOR YOUR HOME:
LIMITED EDITION, PRINTS VS ORIGINALS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

 

 

You want to experience art in your home. You’re not interested in going to an art gallery, nor are you interested in low-cost disposable wall art. You care about quality and don’t mind paying more for something you’ll always have, rather than for something you’ll throw away next season. But, because it’s not your area of expertise, all that jargon can get a bit confusing. What’s a limited edition print? An original? Fine art paper or canvas?

All these options can make you click close and turn a blind eye to those empty walls around you. But before you do that, read on for some key tips to consider when buying art for your home.

 

Original vs Prints

As the name suggests, an original artwork is a one-of-a-kind piece. This is the physical piece the artist has created. Every brush stroke, sweat and tear are in the piece. When selecting a piece of art that integrates a lot of texture, has a 3d effect, or that is painted on canvas and the edges of the canvas have been considered, an original is the most appropriate choice.

 

resource - closeup of original drawing resource - closeup of original artwork with found objects resource - closeup of original artworks on canvas 

SHOP ORIGINALS

 

Prints

Prints are very budget friendly and are a great entry point in experiencing art in your home. They’re produced based on a digital file of the original artwork. Sometimes, the original artwork can’t be sold and in those cases, prints are a great way for the artist to share art that would otherwise never be experienced.


Limited edition prints are when only a certain number of prints are made available for purchase. The number of prints available of each artwork is known as the edition size. Once all the prints in an edition have sold, no more can be produced. The exclusive nature of a limited edition print raises its value. Limited edition prints should come numbered, so you know which number of the series you own.

 

resource - closeup showing numbered limited edition print on fine art paper

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Fine Art Paper vs Canvas

Fine art paper is thick paper with a slight woven texture. Paper prints are a budget-friendly option and allow you the flexibility to frame your art yourself.

Canvas is 100% cotton fabric and is the material that’s typically used by artists to paint on. This option looks closer to an original piece, especially when experienced from a distance. Art prints on canvas can come ready-to-hang, which makes them a very convenient option. In cases where artwork has to be shipped overseas, it’s more economical and safer to ship the artwork rolled in a tube. In that case, artwork on canvas needs to be stretched at a framing shop.

 

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Finishing

No matter what type of art you’re looking at, the finishing is important in determining its quality and how long you can enjoy it for. When buying prints, you should look out for archival materials. This means that if treated properly, the paper has been made to last for up to a 100 years, and it shouldn’t yellow or deteriorate over that time.
 
When buying originals, professional grade materials should be used by the artist to ensure longevity and quality. Originals should also be finished with a protective coating that provides non-yellowing protection against discolouration. Original artwork should come signed and dated by the artist.

 

resource - closeup showing signed and dated original artwork

 

The Story
 
Last – but not least – The story behind an artwork is what gives it meaning and value. It’s how you can enjoy and relate to the artwork, and what provokes good conversation when you’ve got friends round for some drinks.
 
resource - image showing story behind artwork
 

SHOP FOR ART PRINTS      SHOP FOR ORIGINALS

 

 

 

 
 
 

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