Heritage II: Tribal Tears and Bedouin Weavings

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HERITAGE SERIES II: TRIBAL TEARS AND BEDOUIN WEAVINGS
 
I started the initial studies for this collection back in January of 2016, after coming back from a visit to Amman. 
There, I had come across an exhibition of tribal Palestinian jewellery¹, and it took my breath away. 

 
Heritage Series II - Inspiration - Closeup of heritage Palestinian adornments Heritage Series II - Inspiration - Evil eye Heritage Series II - Inspiration - Closeup of heritage Palestinian adornmentsHeritage Series II - Inspiration - Closeup of coin vest worn for protection from evil spirits Heritage Series II - Inspiration - Closeup of coins on decorative scarf. The jingle of the coins was believed to ward off evil spirits Heritage Series II - Inspiration - Closeup of an amulet
 
(Images  from ‘Ya Hafeth Ya Ameen’, the exhibition brochure at The Widad Kawar Collection at TIRAZ Centre)

 

I fell in love with the craftsmanship of the pieces and the stories they told. I’d also come across a gem of a book by Khalil Naouri², that became a source of inspiration for this collection.
 
The next few months were spent studying the elements that attracted me most, through a series of sketches. These were of coin vests, adornments, and Bedouin weavings. As the body of work grew, it became a peaceful homage to the beauty of the Palestinian culture, which is too often associated only with struggle and conflict. The references to Bedouin Jordanian weavings allude to the interweaving of the Palestinian and Jordanian cultures.

 

Sketches

 
Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a Bedouin Jordanian weaving Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a Bedouin Jordanian weaving Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a Bedouin Jordanian weaving Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a Palestinian coin vest Heritage Series II - Closeup sketch study of a Palestinian coin vest Heritage Series II - Sketch study of an amulet featuring a prayer

 

In the heritage Arabian world, people wore jewellery for protection from evil, danger, and disease. Names of angels, words from prayers, or numbers referencing holy verses in the Bible and Quran were used to help protect the wearer. The colour blue appears often and also signified protection.

 

VIEW COLLECTION

 
 

Sketches

Heritage Series II - Sketch study of an amulet featuring the angel Gabriel Heritage Series II - Sketch study of an amulet Heritage Series II - Sketch study of an amulet worn for protection Heritage Series II - Partial sketch study of a Palestinian necklace Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a Palestinian necklace and beads Heritage Series II - Sketch study of an amulet featuring names of angels and numbers referencing holy verses Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a Palestinian amulet Heritage Series II - Partial sketch study of a traditional Arabic adornment Heritage Series II - Sketch study of engraving on a Palestinian amulet Heritage Series II - Sketch study of a beaded necklace Heritage Series II - Sketch study of filigree patterns on an Arabian necklace Heritage Series II - Sketch study using pencil and wire of an Arabian amulet
 


Featured Piece: Tribal Tear

This is one of my favourite pieces in this series. It was featured at an international exhibition that took place in Lake Como, Italy in June 2018.

The piece is an abstract composition of various studies of amulets that were popular in the world of traditional Arabic jewellery. Thought to give protection over evil, danger, and disease, they featured names of angels, as well as words and numbers from prayers in the Bible and Quran. The colour blue appears often and signified protection.  I created this piece using mixed media (acrylics, India ink, and pastels) on archival paper.
 
The original painting is available for sale.  It is also available as a limited edition fine art print.
 

VIEW ARTWORK

 
 
¹At the Widad Kiwar House
²’Hands and Hearts, Weavings from Jordan’, by Khalil Naouri
 
 
 
 

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